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Gov. Hogan talks politics, successes & struggles

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Posted at 11:54 PM, Apr 19, 2016
and last updated 2016-04-20 06:54:09-04

In just one week, Marylanders will head to the polls and vote in the primary election. 

ABC2 Anchor Kelly Swoope sat down one-on-one with Governor Larry Hogan to talk about everything from politics to progress in Maryland.

"Quite frankly I'm disgusted with the whole process in both parties," Hogan said. "I'm not getting too involved."

Hogan has remained out of the presidential candidate mix. Instead of candidates, Hogan is excited for that Maryland matters in the primary election, for a change.

"No endorsements from me," he said. "I think everybody ought to vote their conscience and pick the person they think would be best."

He said he's focusing on what's best for Maryland.

"No. 1 in the nation for job creation. Our little state created more jobs than any other state in the entire country," Hogan said.

As we mark the one year anniversary of the death of Freddie Gray, we remember the city's unrest a year ago. 

"I walked Freddie Gray's neighborhood in Sandtown and talked with his friends and neighbors and walked across the city of a week," Hogan said. "We brought some calm and restored law and order but we've got so much else that has to happen. Part of it is education, where we've invested record amounts, part of it is jobs, which we're pushing for with our jobs initiative."

Hogan said the state is investing hundreds of million taking down blighted properties in the city and encouraging redevelopment, but the work is far from finished. 

He is finished with his cancer treatment and his triumph over non-Hodgkins lymphoma has been pretty amazing.

"I'm happy to be 100 percent cancer free, and in complete remission," he said. "I've got my energy level back and we're out working a full schedule seven days a week. I've just got my hair growing back. It's starting to come."

While the business of running the state continues day to day. The governor says his personal battle with cancer forever changed his life.

"It's a new focus for me.  I'm going to continue whether I'm governor or not to help bring more awareness and raise money so we can eventually find a cure for this terrible disease," he said.

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