Baltimore family mourns two sons lost to gun violence

BALTIMORE (WMAR) - A Baltimore family was saying goodbye to their 18-year-old son when a double shooting turned his funeral into a tragic crime scene. 

MORE: Man killed during shooting at younger brother's funeral

"They only have three children and they lose two children in less than 30 days. It has been a devastating blow to the family," Dr. Cleveland Mason said. 

Marcus Brown was taken by gun violence in Baltimore City. His older brother, 32-year-old Maurice Brown Jr. was shot and killed just feet away from this brother's unburied body. 

"It was just heartbreaking to be with the family as Shock Trauma and just see how emotionally distraught they were," Mason said 

Mason is the senior pastor at Perkins Square Baptist Church in West Baltimore, where the family gathered before the burial for a service and celebration of Marcus' life. Maurice was there, mourning the loss of his little brother. 

"He just wanted to spend time with his brother. The shock of it all. The unexpectedness of it kind of left everyone in a lost place," Mason said.

Mason says there was no disruption at the service. Absolutely no indication of what was to come just a few hours later. A new look at surveillance video shows what happened. A group starts to separate from the burial service and they stop just before the treeline. An exchange happens, shots, running and a man falls to the ground as the funeral attendees run away. Detectives were back at Mt Zion Cemetery today, collecting evidence, focusing on the same area shown in the video. 

"We've got to wrap our arms around each other and encourage each other to move forward," Mason said.

Moving forward, Mason says there needs to be a change.

"We must never get to the place where the senseless violence that is taking place is normalized. We must always see it as a problem that we must get rid of," Mason said. "Legislators can do all they can to create laws to try and encourage safety and policemen can only bring support, but the real work is in the family. The real work is in the community. The people must come together and take ownership of this problem and we’ve got to talk to our children. We’ve got the engage out neighbors to help people understand the sanctity of life; that life is a sacred gift and should not be taken so trivially."
 
"There’s really not much for young people to do. Recreation centers are closed and they’re not many programs in the community that capture those persons and give them something positive to do and so that has to become a focus of our city"

 

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