Kevin Kamenetz remembered by family, peers and community

County executive died from cardiac arrest at 60

Long-time Baltimore County leader Kevin Kamenetz was laid to rest Friday.  He died Thursday. The Baltimore County Executive was sent off by politicians at every level, including the governor.

But it was the words of his beloved family, that are hardest to forget.

"I owe every single aspect of my life to him.  And although I rarely show the affection he deserved, I hope my dad knew how much he meant to me," said Karson Kamenetz, his 16-year-old son.

His heartfelt words hard to forget.

"I hope he died knowing that he was my role model.  I hope he died knowing that I loved him endlessly. 

Jill Kamenetz, his wife, bravely approached the podium to say goodbye to the man she was destined to be with.

"I knew that Kevin was the one for me on the second date, I just did."

Now the only parent to Karson and Dylan, Ms. Kamenetz gave her husband a touching yet humorous tribute.

"If Kevin were here, he would say, wow, what a great turnout!"

Kamenetz died Thursday from cardiac arrest leaving his real and political family behind.

"He gave his most precious resource to help others.  His time, his talent, his leadership to repair our community to make it better for future generations," said Senator Ben Cardin.

Kamenetz served Baltimore County as its executive for two terms.  He was also a county councilman for 16 years.  Before that, an assistant state's attorney running a private practice.    His latest political endeavor was run for Maryland governor.  A challenge his wife feared would be detrimental.

"He was looking tired to me.  Just last week I said to him, Kevin, this campaign is killing you."

She reminded the crowd of how driven he was, how well he cared for her, how he always managed to get everything done and how hard losing him is.

"I have to say goodbye today to my rock, my best friend, my confidant, my partner and my love of 19 years," she said.

Kamenetz was laid to rest at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery.  He was 60. Contributions in his memory can be made to the American Cancer Society and the Baltimore Humane Society.

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