NewsLocal News

Actions

Officials announce $5 million investment addressing chronic flooding issues

Posted at 7:14 PM, Oct 28, 2021
and last updated 2021-10-28 19:14:54-04

BALTIMORE — Residents feel some relief is finally in sight after suffering decades from property damage surrounding floodwaters.

Elected officials announced a $5 million investment to address chronic flooding in Baltimore .

Anytime storms hit this side of town, neighbors bear the brunt of it so much so they tell me this stop sign disappears underwater…but they’re glad to hear the city is making an investment that will address this decades long issue. 

There are sore memories etched in Mrs. Pamela Luallen-Williams' mind reinforced every time there’s word of a storm looming.

“At one time the fire department had to rescue people to get out of this block because it was so bad. There were people in their cars and they couldn’t swim so they had to go get them," Luallen-Williams said.

Officials behind the funding say they have plans to build a water study model to observe flood patterns in critical areas in an effort to solve them before they happen.

"Action is being taken. We’re working on this diligently to do the right research to do the right thing for residents. This isn’t going to happen tomorrow but we are working on it," shared Baltimore City Councilwoman Odette Ramos.

Porches basements cars all on the list of property lost over the years costing them hundreds- thousands of dollars.

On top of that, the anxiety from past experiences with flooding.

"This woman could not swim. Her floor gave in and she went to the basement now that’s bad. That’s how much water we have," said Luallen-Williams.

"It’s a drop in the bucket. We know that there’s hundreds of millions of dollars to really address all of the issues," Senator Mary Washington explained.

"Thank God we’re getting ready to get some help and we need the help. We really do," said Williams.

But she urges those over the project to communicate their progress as often as they can.

Leaders spearheading the project say they expect the survey process to begin in a matter of days.