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Baltimore City lifting most COVID-19 capacity restrictions

Brandon Scott
Posted at 2:40 PM, May 12, 2021
and last updated 2021-05-12 17:27:52-04

BALTIMORE — Mayor Brandon Scott on Wednesday lifted most indoor and outdoor COVID-19 capacity restrictions in Baltimore.

There are three exceptions listed below.

  • Convention and Banquet Facilities (defined as convention facilities, conference facilities, banquet and catering facilities, community halls, and Social Clubs, including without limitation, hotel ballrooms).
  • Indoor Venues (defined as any indoor venue in Maryland at which live performances occur, motion pictures are shown, or sporting events occur (including, without limitation, major league, professional, minor league, semi-professional, amateur, recreational, motor sports, and collegiate sporting events)
  • Outdoor Venues (defined as any outdoor venue in Maryland at which (i) live performances occur, motion pictures are shown, or sporting events occur (including, without limitation, major league, professional, minor league, semi- professional, amateur, recreational, motor sports, and collegiate sporting events), and (ii) entry is limited to ticketed customers; provided, however, that the term “Outdoor Venue” does not include golf courses and driving ranges, outdoor archery and shooting ranges, marinas and watercraft rental businesses, campgrounds, horse boarding and riding facilities, drive-in movie theaters, outdoor swimming pools, outdoor day camps, amusement parks, tour boats, miniature golf establishments, and go-kart tracks.

Although restaurants can return to full capacity for indoor dining, customers will be unable to stand inside whereas outside standing is allowed.

New changes go into effect May 17 at 6 a.m.

The news comes the same day the city announced outdoor pools would be reopening May 29.

Large events later this year such as Artscape and 4th of July fireworks have already been canceled.

As of Wednesday, 29.65 percent of the city's population has received a second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in addition to just over 2 percent who received a single dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine.