News

Actions

State rests on Day 5 of Officer Caesar Goodson's trial

CORP-Digital-Default-Image-1280x720-WMAR.png
Posted at 11:01 AM, Jun 15, 2016
and last updated 2016-06-16 06:24:34-04
BALTIMORE (AP) - Prosecutors rested their case on the fifth day of the trial for a Baltimore police officer facing a murder charge in the in-custody death of a man whose neck was broken in the back of a police van.
 
The wagon driver, Caesar Goodson, is facing second-degree murder, manslaughter and other charges stemming from the death of Freddie Gray.
 
Prosecutors say Goodson gave Gray a "rough ride" when he left him unrestrained by a seatbelt but handcuffed and shackled in the back of the wagon. Prosecutors also say Goodson was negligent when he failed to call for medical help.
 
Goodson's attorneys say the officer didn't give Gray a rough ride, and did nothing wrong.
 
A Baltimore paramedic testified about seeing Freddie Gray at the police station where he was taken after his neck was broken in a police van.
 
Angelique Herbert testified Wednesday that Gray didn't appear to be breathing. Herbert spoke of efforts to resuscitate Gray. She also says his eyes were open, but he wasn't blinking or responding, and his neck "felt crumbly, like a bag of rocks." 
 
 
A major development occurred earlier Wednesday when prosecutors handed over notes that indicated Medical Examiner Dr. Carol Allan, who performed the autopsy on Gray, discussed Gray's death as an accident. 
 
During her testimony, Allan said "at no time did the word accident cross my lips."