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Day 4 of testimony underway in Ofc. Caesar Goodson's trial

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Posted at 9:42 AM, Jun 14, 2016
and last updated 2016-06-14 17:44:08-04
BALTIMORE (AP) -  A blood expert has testified that suspected blood stains found in the back of a Baltimore Police transport wagon where a prisoner's neck was broken were indeed blood, and another witness said DNA analysis confirmed it belonged to the prisoner who died.
 
Serologist Virginia Cates testified Tuesday in the trial of an officer charged with murder in death of the prisoner, Freddie Gray. Officer Caesar Goodson faces second-degree murder, manslaughter and other charges.
 
Cates confirmed that what investigators found in the back of Goodson's transport wagon was blood. DNA analyst Thomas Herbert testified that five of the 20 swabs taken matched Gray's DNA.
 
Prosecutors say Goodson gave Gray a "rough ride" in his wagon, and intentionally failed to buckle him into a seat belt or call for medical help. Goodson's attorneys say the officer did nothing wrong.
 
Goodson is the third of six police officers to go to trial for Gray's death. Gray died April 19, a week after his neck was broken in the back of Goodson's wagon.
 
Prosecutors entered into evidence several closed-circuit television videos showing the wagon's roughly 45-minute ride from the site of Gray's arrest to the Western District station house, where he arrived unconscious.
Prosecutors also turned over a packet of information to the defense after a judge last week admonished the state for withholding exculpatory information from Goodson's attorneys. The defense will review the information and determine whether to file more motions.
 

 

ABC2 News contributed to this report.

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