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1 year since Freddie Gray's arrest

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Posted at 9:21 AM, Apr 11, 2016
and last updated 2018-12-31 14:36:08-05
BALTIMORE (AP) -- In the year since Freddie Gray died, the Baltimore police department has worked on its relationship with the community and tried to heal wounds opened during protests and rioting last spring.
 
April 12 marks one year since Gray's arrest. He was injured while in police custody and died a week later. His arrest was caught on camera. 
 
Gray's death was ruled a homicide by severe trauma after he suffered a spinal cord injury while not belted inside of a police van. Six Baltimore City Police officers face charges in the case. 
 
 
Part of the department's efforts have been putting more officers on foot patrol in poor, mostly black neighborhoods and encouraging beat cops to get more involved in the community.
 
Officer Ken Hurst is one of 450 police officers who are part of a foot patrol program aimed at getting police officers out of their cars and onto the streets of Baltimore's most dangerous neighborhoods, not to make arrests but to make friends. Hurst, a white officer, believes the efforts are paying off. Some in the community agree; others are skeptical.
 
ABC2 News contributed to this report. 
 

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