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Forever flooding

Severn man appeals to county for help
Posted: 6:21 PM, Sep 28, 2018
Updated: 2018-09-28 22:21:52Z

It is yet more evidence that water runs downhill.

"That drain across the street runs down the street."
    
And Michael Hardee is learning that the hard way.

"This drain runs down there."
    
The recent record rainfall has contributed to a swamp in Hardee's backyard in Severn, which refuses to dry up.

"Nothing dries up,” said Hardee, “Everything gets mold.  The fence is turning green.  Water was all the way up to these steps and rolling into the house."
    
Hardee moved his family of six into the home last year after purchasing it as a foreclosure.
    
That means he bought it "as is", but "as it currently is", with the flooding, mold and mosquito problems, he's worried about his family's health.

"If the county executive's office or backyard was flooding like this, I bet you something would be done about it,” said Hardee, “This isn't flooding from my backyard.  This is storm water not being routed incorrectly."
    
Hardee says the county has permitted a pair of housing developments since his house was built, and that's where he's turned to find a solution.

"Certainly, short term solutions for the curbing and conveyance of storm water for Clark Station Road and the surrounding streets,” said Public Works Spokesman Matt Diehl, “We have a consultant that we're going to bring on board.  Hope to have some good efforts moving forward to address this."
    
Good efforts that have been a long time in coming.
    
The county points to unusual weather patterns.

"Some of these storm water management ponds have been designed to sustain the 100-year flood,” said Diehl, “but it seems like we're having a 100-year flood every five years."
    
And while long term solutions will take time and money, Hardee says he's running out of both after weathering three-foot floodwaters four times in the last year. 

"I know everybody's budget is tight,” said Hardee, “My budget is tight, but they've allowed this by giving out the permits that they've given out and they still continue to give out the permits."