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Maryland Snap recipients to receive more money in their accounts this month

Hogan wants to use left over budget surplus on tax relief
Gov. Larry Hogan
Posted at 3:30 PM, Oct 07, 2021
and last updated 2021-10-07 17:20:48-04

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Governor Larry Hogan on Thursday announced federal approval to release additional emergency SNAP benefits this month.

Those who already received their October payment will see the additional money automatically loaded to their EBT card by October 12.

Here is a breakdown of the revised amount you can expect to receive once that additional money is included.


Household Size

EA for 48 States & D.C.

1

$250

2

$459

3

$658

4

$835

5

$992

6

$1,190

7

$1,316

8

$1,504

Each additional person

$188

Future expanded benefits are determined on a month-to-month basis by the federal government, and are not intended to be permanent.

When the federal government does discontinue funding that extra money, SNAP recipients will still receive their standard amount.

In other news, Hogan laid out a five-point plan for utilizing a record $2.5 billion balance that currently sits in the state's general fund.

Some of those goals include relief for retirees and an increase to the rainy day fund.

The surplus marks the first time since fiscal year 1999, that Maryland is projected to spend less money than what's taken in.

Comptroller Peter Franchot on September 29, said a significant share of the balance is attributed to better-than-expected 2020 state tax revenue.

According to Hogan, that number is estimated to be $1.6 billion higher than projected and state agency reversions are $195 million more than expected.

“Already some politicians see this as a chance to go on a big spending spree with pet projects, big payouts to special interests, and new mandated increases in spending. That is not going to happen on my watch," said Hogan.

Franchot previously said the $2.5 billion left over accounts for more than five percent of the 2021 operating budget and is 11.3 percent over pre-COVID numbers in Fiscal Year 2019.