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Flu season is here, time to get your flu shot

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Posted at 11:27 PM, Jan 02, 2017
and last updated 2017-01-03 06:15:00-05
Health experts say now's the time to get your flu shot if you haven't already.  Peak season is coming up and this year, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have a couple new recommendations.
 
"Fever, sore throat, running nose, cough and lost of muscle and joint aches," nurse practitioner, Terry Dyer, told ABC2.
 
The symptoms you hate to wake up with--and now the CDC is saying how you protect yourself from the flu has changed.
 
"The CDC is not recommending people get the flu mist, the nasal flu mist they want everyone to get the injectables," Dyer said.
 
Instead she recommends getting the standard injectable vaccine.
 
"There's the standard flu vaccine, there's also a high dose vaccine for older people 65 and older," said Dyer.
 
And there's even a needle-less vaccine that's given intradermally; plus another form with additives to make it more effective.  Whichever you choose, experts say make it a priority
 
"The more people that get vaccinated it protects the whole community as well as your family, you get less illnesses less time off at work and school," said Dyer.
 
Flu season hasn't hit peak yet but health experts expect it to soon
 
"The high peak season is from December to February so expecting to see a lot more in the next couple weeks. We're about one-tenth above the national average for the flu," said Dyer.
 
That means we're pretty much on track but still, prevention is key.
 
"Do the good hand washing, cover your mouth, try to avoid people who are sick," Dyer said.
 
But it's most important for high risk groups to protect themselves from the flu.
 
"It's very high risk for elderly or children under the age of 5 or for anyone that has chronic medical problems," said Dyer.
 
Experts say stay home if you're sick.  It can take 7 to 10 days for the flu to leave your system.  Also, you can get the shot up until February, as long as there is flu activity.
 
Plus, Dyer says the shot helps to build your viral immunity.