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5-year-old Howard County girl among 107 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Maryland

88% increase in last 48 hrs.
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Posted at 10:25 AM, Mar 19, 2020
and last updated 2020-03-19 17:21:34-04

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — On Thursday morning, Governor Larry Hogan announced there are 107 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Maryland.

One of those cases is a 5-year-old Howard County girl, who attends Elkridge Elementary School.

She is the first child diagnosed thus far in the state.

Howard County officials said during a press conference that the staff and students are not at risk because the girl did not contract it while she was in school.

The news comes a day after Hogan announced the state's first virus related death, a Prince George's County man in his 60's with underlying health conditions.

Hogan said the man contracted the virus through community transmission. On Wednesday, Baltimore City health officials confirmed five cases some of which are also community transmitted.

The Governor also said Thursday all malls and entertainment venues in Maryland will be ordered to shut down effective 5 p.m.

Hogan said no one should be boarding or riding any MTA or metro based travel unless they are essential personnel.

Also on Thursday Hogan banned any events or gatherings of more than 10 people, in coordination with CDC guidelines.

“Despite all of our repeated warnings for weeks, and in spite of the rapid escalation of this crisis across our state, the nation, and the world, some people are treating this like a vacation or a spring break with parties, cookouts, and large gatherings,” said Governor Hogan. “Let me be very clear—if you are engaged in this, you are in violation of state law and you are endangering the lives of your fellow Marylanders.”

Hogan is also restricting access to BWI airport to anyone other than ticketed passengers or airport workers.

To help deliver supplies, Hogan said he was allowing trucks to exceed freight weight limits.

Hogan is also permitting bars, wineries, and distilleries to deliver alcohol to customers beyond what's normally permitted by law.